Reading guide

Below we list articles from various publications, mainly British but also some from abroad, which feature subject matter relating to electric railways and traction. If you subscribe to other magazines and notice appropriate articles please advise the details to the Secretary.

Boom time for Cannon Street, Rail, 27  November 2013, page 49
Detailed look at operations at this terminus serving the heart of “The City” (in London)

Crossrail update, Modern Railways, December 2013, supplement
Twenty one page well illustrated supplement detailing progress on all aspects of this major construction exercise.

Southern builds capacity, Modern Railways, December  2013, page 67
Information about the new class 377 and 387 units that will boost Southern’s passenger capacity.

A bang-up job at Balham, Rail, 11 December 2013, page 66
Description of the complex work to ease congestion at this South London junction which has won the National Rail Award  “Project for the year”. The work was completed during a ten-day blockade over Christmas and the New Year in 2012.

The Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway North Liverpool electrification,          Backtrack, December 2013, page 740
Long article with 11 illus and good map recounting the L&Y’s response to tramway competition in first years of 20th century with conversion of the lines to Southport, Crossens, Ormskirk and Aintree. Rolling stock details included.

The Alton Branch, Today’s Railways UK, January  2014, page 42
Good description of this South West Trains branch. Nine good illustrations.

CP5 rolling stock market uncertain, Modern Railways, January 2014, page 24
Assessment of likely emu requirements during next five years suggests that 800 new vehicles will be needed.

London Underground Special, Rail, 8 January 2014, page 55
Twenty one pages to celebrate the150th birthday of the London Underground.  Includes description of the initial line and the state today of the first stations; The “Ghost” or closed stations with much information about Aldwych and the never used passageways there.

Know your trams, Rail, 22 January 2014, page 48
Short description of each of the different types of modern trams at present in use on the UK’s new light rail systems.

Reading revitalised, Rail, 22 January 2014, page 68
Handy update on the major upgrade work at Reading station.

Express emus for Kent and south coast, Traction, February 2014, page 24
Long article with 12 illustrations reviewing the design of trains introduced during the 1960s to operate on the newly electrified routes to Kent and Channel coast destinations.

TPE goes electric, (TransPennine Express), Today’s Railways UK, February 2014,   page 8
Short article but with 7 illustrations describing the start of electric services between Manchester and Central Scotland using the new class 350 emus.

The Northern Line – how it works, (London Underground), Today’s Railways UK, February 2014, page 48
Long article with 14 illustrations and two maps detailing the history and operations of London Underground’s most complex line.

All aboard the Brighton Belle, Back Track, February 2014, page 96
Photo feature with five illustrations showing the 5-BEL sets in traditional brown/cream Pullman livery and BR’s blue/grey colour scheme.

Endangered species DB Class 143, Today’s Railways Europe, February 2014, page 22
Once the most numerous class in East Germany with 647 built the rapidly diminishing number still at work are now confined to freight services.

Express Emus for Kent and the South Coast, Traction, February 2014, page 24
Discussion about the rather conventional stock acquired for these electrification schemes of the 1950s and 60s.

Driving a “Class 83” – Polish style, Traction, February 2014, page 34
EE’s Vulcan Foundry built twenty class EU06 locos for the Polish State Railway. They were very similar to BR class 83 locos apart from taking power at 3000V dc.  Later two batches of similar locos – EU07 – were produced and this article describes the operation of these later machines.

Mail by rail – still, Rail, 5 February 2014, page 64
Look at history of mail services on the railways and at the present day operations.

Manchester:  a united city, Rail, 19 February 2014, page 62
Description of tram system and future plans.

Soton – Sheffield.  Switching on to the electric spine, Rail, 19 February 2014,  page 68
Progress report on the scheme to electrify the route from the port of Southampton to the industrial cities of Nottingham and Sheffield.

Waiting for the wires: electrification leads and lags, Back Track, March 2014, page 134
Fascinating look at the time that has elapsed between initial plans and eventual completion of some schemes such as Caledonian Rly proposal for Glasgow routes in 1898, or plans for East Coast Main Line in 1931.

Changing face of the West Coast electrics, Back Track, March 2014, page 160
Four colour photographs depicting WCML locomotives in the very different liveries of passenger or freight TOCs.

Across the Johor Strait by high speed rail, Railway Gazette International,        March 2014, page 46
Comments on the planned 330km long high-speed line planned between Singapore
and Kuala Lumpur.  This city link is one of the busiest air corridors in the world
and the railway could take a large slice of the traffic.

Power steering:an electrification strategy, Rail, 5 March 2014, page 66
Interview with the director of engineering of Systra UK about the new BR electrification programme.

Through service between railway operators in Greater Tokyo
Japan Railway and Transport Review, March  2014, page 14
Many subway routes are linked to railways operating far into the suburbs.  Through traffic has risen from 4m to over 14m per year.

London’s Overground, Today’s Railways UK, April 2014, page 28
Long well illustrated description of Transport for London’s major success.

Leeds – the Yorkshire hub, Today’s Railways UK, April 2014, page 42
Description of the services radiating from Leeds on which traffic has risen sharply.

French electric power, Traction. April 2014, page 38
Photo-feature including twelve good illustrations of French locomotives in service.

Olympic Transcons of the Milwaukee Road, Passenger Train Journal,                 Issue 1 of  2014, page 20
Superb 16 page photo-feature about the Chicago – Seattle route that was electrified between Harlowtown – Avery, and Othello – Seattle, using the Bipolar and “Little Joe” locomotives.

Sparks effect, Modern Railways, April 2014, page 44
Examination of plans to electrify many routes during Control Period 5.

FCC  prepares for class 700s, Modern Railways, April 2014, page 59
Update on Thameslink work as massive rolling stock order is placed.

French electric power, Traction, April 2014, page 38
Photo-feature with twelve illustrations and captions.

Electric loco haulage in France, Today’s Railways Europe, April 2014, page 32
Well illustrated article about the declining number of loco hauled trains still running in France.

The last post, Rail, 2 April 2014, page 62
Well illustrated article about the now closed  Post Office Railway in London.

Birmingham New Street – Redditch, Today’s Railways UK, May 2014, page 42
Long well illustrated article describing commuter route which is the southern half of the Cross City Line between Birmingham and the growing new town. Upgrades to boost frequencies detailed. Major error concerning car park provision at Selly Oak.

Carlisle – How it came to have just one station, Today’s Railways UK, May 2014, page 52
Detailed history and description of today’s operations with a track  plan and many illustrations.

Kinlochleven – a pioneer hydro-electric line and its setting, Back Track, May 2014, page 27
Excellent lengthy article describing this short line linking a pier with an aluminium works in the days before there were decent roads or a nearby main line railway making transport by coastal shipping necessary. Five illustrations.

Two of a kind, Back Track, May 2014, page 314
Interesting comparison between the elegant buildings of two London Underground termini – Uxbridge and Cockfosters – both designed by Charles Holden and built in the 1930s. Five photos.

Sub-surface resignalling, The LU view, Modern Railways, May 2014, page 24
The debate continues on resignalling plans following the cancellation of earlier automatic train control contracts.

Siemens in the UK rail industry, Modern Railways, May 2014, 16 page supplement
Detailed look at the work being undertaken by Siemens including Thameslink ECTS control system; New Inspiro metro trains; Class 350 emus for service in north west England.

Tramway et électricité de Constantinople, Railway Philately, March 2014, XXX
In addition to describing stamps that feature the tramways of Istanbul, there is a history of the city’s tramways, plus system maps from 1920 and the present day.

Leipzig’s rail network: transformed by new City-Tunnel,Today’s Railways Europe May 2014, page 22
Services commenced operation on 15 December 2013 with several new through services linking distant suburbs with Halle and Leipzig.  Leipzig Hbf has been upgraded with an impressive concourse. Two detailed maps and many illustrations.

Traxx along then line, Today’s Railways Europe, May 2014, page 36
Photo-feature depicting Bombardier Traxx locomotives in very varied liveries passing one location over a five hour period. Seven illustrations plus detailed captions.

Meet the X’Melino, Rail, 30 April 2014, page 48
Account of events on 1 April 2014 involving the re-branding of Virgin’s 11 car Pendolino train  390-155 to advertise the latest X-men film “Days of Future Past”.  For the day  Wolverhampton Station was renamed Wolverine which was shown on screens at Euston for a special working to and from London calling at stations named after characters in the film.   Written by a well known railway officer in a new film industry role! Looks like an All Fool’s Day spoof but is 100% genuine!  

How the Network SouthEast was won, Rail, 30 April 2014, page 72
Account of the early days of NSE created on 10 June 1986.   Later developments included the establishment of the Thameslink service in 1988.

High Speed – High Stakes, Trains, May 2014, page 40
Serious examination of the developing high-speed networks across Europe.  16 illustrations and 4 maps.

Modular overhead will speed NR wiring campaign, Railway Gazette Int’l,  May 2014, page 43
The London-Bristol – Cardiff route will be the first major project to use a TSI compliant design that will be cheaper to install and become more reliable. The article then details the full scope of new electrification plans in the United Kingdom with maps and diagrams.

Under construction – Underground-bound, Rail (Derby Supplement), 14 May 2014,  page 11
Comprehensive look at the London Underground S-Stock trains being built in Bombardier’s Litchurch Lane factory in Derby.

Bon  Anniversaire! Rail, 14 May 2014, page 70
Celebration of the Channel Tunnel services which started operation twenty years ago.

High speeds – high stakes, Trains, May 2014, page 40
Survey of high speed services operated in Europe by private operators.  

The “Pretendolino”, Traction, May/June 2014, page 32
Account of the Mark 3 coach set with class 90 locomotive assembled after class 390 Pendolino train was wrecked in the Grayrigg derailment.  Used on London – Birmingham services between March 2007 and May 2011.

Anyone for Eastcheap? Back Track, June 2014, page 331
Twenty seven stations along the Metropolitan District line of the London Underground have changed their names. For instance Eastcheap became The Monument and later simply Monument. The article details all the changes.  Good photographs.

Bad luck electric, Classic Trains, Summer 2014, page 40
Story of ex-New Haven RR electric locomotive that became Penn Central Class E40 no 4973. It had an unusual series of mishaps and accidents being eventually burnt out by a fire.

What next for Channel Tunnel passenger trains? Today’s Railways Europe, June 2014, page 20
There will be new operators with trains to new destinations deeper into Europe.

Swiss streamliners, Today’s Railways Europe, June 2014, page 36
In the 1930s a series of light streamlined railcars was introduced to recently electrified secondary routes in Switzerland. One remains serviceable and operates many chartered trips each year.

By EMU to Onehunga, Metro Report International, June 2014, page 18
Comprehensive introduction to the electrification work around Auckland with start of first service, to Onehunga on 28 April 2014.

Need for speed, New Civil Engineer, 15 May 2014, page 20
Useful description of construction work along the new 302 km long high speed railway from Tours to Bordeaux. Innovative work on the 22 viaducts along the route have slashed the time taken by nearly half.

Cross-border conversion poses a complex challenge, Railway Gazette Int., June 2014, page 30
An RER network is being created around Geneva and a major step is being taken to change the Bellegarde – Geneva Cornavin line (33km) from 1.5kV DC to 25 kV AC 50 Hz so that the entire RER system will operate at the higher voltage.

The Hammersmith & City 150 years on, Today’s Railways UK, July 2014, page 28.
History of how this historic route was built together with note about the new S stock.
Well illustrated.

Manchester Metrolink bids farewell to trusty T68s, Rail 11 June 2014, page 24.
A special farewell tour of the system was organised on 26 May 2014 as the last public workings of the first stock on Manchester’s Metrolink network. Illustration.

Putting passengers first, Rail 11 June 2014, page 53.
Analysis of the newly announced franchise agreements for the TSGN ( Thameslink, Southern & Great Northern) mega-franchise and the Caledonian Sleepers.

Crossrail comes to the surface, Rail 11 June 2014, page 54.
Progress report on this massive project on which work is now moving from the central tunnel section to the surface and above ground sections reaching into the suburbs.  Well illustrated.

Catch the train and you’ve caught the plane, Rail 11 June 2014, page 60.
History of the Gatwick Express service as it has developed over thirty years.  Many illustrations.

The 1967 electrification to Bournemouth, Traction, July/August 2014, page 6.
History of this penny-pinching scheme and details of how through services to Weymouth were managed with diesel power only beyond Bournemouth.

Amtrak’s Cities Sprinters, off and running, Passenger Train Journal, Issue 2 of 2014, page 6.
Account of the development of a new express passenger electric locomotive by Siemens and its introduction into service along the North East Corridor on 6 February 2014.

Mega EMU project gets under way, Railway Gazette International, July 2014, page 40.
Description of task to replace much of the suburban emu fleet in South Africa by construction of 3500 vehicles over next ten years. At least as many additional coaches are expected to be required over the subsequent decade to meet an anticipated population growth.

A tunnel to benefit northern Europe, Railway Gazette International, July 2014, page 54.
Description of the Fehmarnbelt Fixed Link project to build a road and rail tunnel between Rødby in Denmark and Puttgarden in Germany together with the upgrading and electrification of the Rinsted – Rødby and Puttgarden – Lübeck lines. Links across northern Europe will be shortened with Sweden – Germany times massively shortened with traffic routed via the Øresund Link and then the Fehmarnbelt line which is due to open in 2021.

For further information please follow the links:

Fehmarnbelt Fixed Link

Fehmarnbelt Fixed Link – Wikipedia

Tunnel freight growing – at last, Today’s Railways Europe, July 2014, page 29.
Positive report of how various categories of freight traffic passing through the Channel Tunnel is at last rising significantly.

T68s: A life remembered, Rail 9 July 2014, page 70.
Detailed look at the now withdrawn initial trams used on the Manchester Metrolink network . Mention of very similar trams,T69s, though with different body shells, used on Midland Metro.  On both systems the trams have showed mechanical and body-work deficiencies and new stock is now replacing them.

A streetcar named Revival, Trains, July 2014, page 24
Detailed look at new and planned systems across the USA including details of manufacturers of LRVs based in USA. 18 illustrations.

From City to City – New Street to Lichfield, Today’s Railways UK, August 2014, page 38.
Detailed description of the northern half of the Cross City Line with seventeen illustrations or tables/diagrams.

Doncaster – a world-famous railway centre, Today’s Railways UK, August 2014, page 46.
History of this former Roman town and how the coming of the railways transformed it.  Topics include – rise and decline of Doncaster Works – transformation of services following electrification from 1989 – importance of freight traffic handled.   Twelve illustrations plus track diagram.

Give my regards to Broad Street, Back Track. August 2014, page 496.
Part 1 of detailed history of the LME suburban services to Watford Junction and Richmond from Euston and Broad Street termini.  Sixteen illustrations (eight in colour) and three maps/diagrams including one showing planned loop line underneath Euston Station.   This is a “must read” for those interested in London’s railways.

Virgin West Coast, Modern Railways, August 2013, page 52.
Details of what Virgin must provide during the three year extension of this franchise.

By train to the Belgian Coast, Today’s Railways Europe, August 2014, page 20.
Detailed description of the several railways that run from inland cities to the Channel coast. Six illustrations and two maps/diagrams.   Full timetable details.

Zurich’s new S-bahn tunnel, Today’s Railways Europe, August 2014, page 28.
Detailed description of new S-Bahn route between Oerlikon and Löwenstrasse Station (under the Hbf) and future extension to Altstetten with details of the services that will use the route and rolling stock that will be used. Six illustrations, useful map, and two diagrammatic representations of Löwenstrasse station.

The 1967 electrification to Bournemouth, Traction, July/August 2014, page 6.
Description of the penny-pinching scheme to extend the third rail electrification to Bournemouth but not to Weymouth.   Operational problems of working Weymouth through trains, and boat trains to Southampton, Weymouth and Lymington, and why the Bournemouth Belle pullman was axed.

Croydon’s quiet expansion, Rail, 6 August 2014,  page 74
Well illustrated account of the latest changes being made to Tramlink infrastructure and services.

The railway origins of the Tyne and Wear Metro network, Today’s Railways UK, August 2014, Page 28.
Profusely illustrated account of railways from as far back as the 1830s which now form part of the Tyne and Wear Metro.    Sixteen illustrations; two maps/diagrams.

Big in Japan and now the UK, Rail, 20 August 2014, page 48
Special report on Hitachi’s plans to provide intercity, commuter, and Metro trains for European cities building them at the new Aycliffe factory in north east England.   Progress on construction of the factory detailed.  9 illustrations.

Endangered species: Vintage Stern & Hafferl stock, Today’s Railways Europe, September 2014, Page 22.
Detailed description of elderly trams/emus operating on five Austrian lines likely to be replaced soon by brand new units.   Eight illustrations.

Schynige Platte Bahn:An electric centenary, Today’s Railways Europe, September 2014, page 26.
This mountain railway near Interlaken, Switzerland, was steam powered until electric traction was introduced from 9 May 1914.   Electric locomotives were supplied by local firm Alioth and remain in use today along with a few slightly newer machines and one of the 19th century steam locos which operates the works train.   The locos are numbered and most carry names – which are moved between the locomotives!   Seven photographs and one useful detailed map.

Citynightline: A slow but sure decline, Today’s Railways Europe, October 2014, page 20.
Account of the venture to provide from 1995 high quality overnight trains across Europe using new rolling stock given the “Citynightline” brand name. After an encouraging start traffic has faded as passengers have opted for the high-speed daytime trains and the article charts the removal of many services. Seven illustrations, map showing the complexities of the network, and two diagrams showing some complex service patterns.

Railfanning Around Zürich, Today’s Railways Europe, October 2014, page 28.
Guide to longer distance services radiating from Zürich with helpful information about regular frequency timetables. Thirteen illustrations, table of departure times each hour from the Hbf, and a fine map. (Information about suburban services in Zürich was in the September issue).

The Red Revolution, Rail: 1 October 2014,  page 56.
A look at how Virgin’s Pendolino trains are maintained at Longsite and Wembley Depots.

Britain’s Hardest Working Train, Rail: 1 October 2014, page 60.
Substantial well illustrated article following the progress of eleven car Pendolino set 390.104 as it undertakes the longest daily mileage of any train in the UK. The trains does a Euston – Liverpool return trip, followed by a return trip to Glasgow, and finally a one-way journey to Manchester totalling over 1300 miles, and carrying 4640 passengers during the day.

DSB  Sets Out Fleet Plans,  Today’s Railways Europe, November 2014, page 34.
Detailed plans for the electrification of several main routes and for the new trains that will take over services across the nation.    Eight illustrations and one map.

80 Years  for  Class E.428,  Today’s Railways Europe, November 2014, page 38.
Account of the once numerous Italian general purpose locomotives introduced in 1934.   Eight of the 242 machines remain in use and five are preserved.  Five illustrations.

Crowd  Control, Modern Railways,  November 2014, page 68.
Report of overcrowding on commuter trains entering London and certain provincial cities.   Peak hour loads into each London terminus and the numbers (about 12%) who have to stand are tabulated.    Brief statistics given for other cities.

HS2 Matters: Design Proffered for Crewe “Superhub”. RAIL 12 November 2014, page 36.
Controversy continues about the location of a station on HS2 to serve The Potteries and South Cheshire with a strong case made for a station beside the existing Crewe station giving interchange with West Coast express and many local services.   A couple of diagrams show the appearance of this station.

Testing  on  the  T.  RAIL 12 November 2014, page 50.
Description of the measures taken to test completely the new Hyundai Rotem double deck stock that will operate on MBTA (the “T”) commuter services around Boston MA.

Wien  Hauptbahnhof  Opens. Today’s Railways Europe, December 2014, page 30.
Good account of the background of the massive Vienna Hauptbahnhof project. Seven illustrations.

After the Wall: Berlin and its Railways Today. Today’s Railways Europe, December 2014, page 34.
The first of three articles describing this complex subject and giving considerable information about the effects on the city and its transport links by the Cold War and the Berlin Wall.  This leads to a description of the reunification of the various parts of the city and of the rail network today.   Later articles will describe present regional services from Berlin, and a final article will examine major projects to enhance the network and provide good airport links.   Twelve illustrations

Amtrak’s New Electric Workhorse, Trains, January 2015, page 25
Engineers and mechanical personnel provide insight on ACS-64 locomotives as they enter regular service. 11 illustrations (10 in colour).

From  the  “Met”  to  the  Mersey,  Backtrack, December 2014, page 754.
Account of the transfer of Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan stock to work on Mersey/Wirral lines in 1940 following major damage to Mersey lines stock in a wartime air raid.

Whole magazine,  Modern Locomotives Illustrated, No 210, December 2014/January 2015.
Comprehensive account of Locomotive classes 89 and 90 with large selection of full colour illustrations.

Eurostar unveils new “E320”, Modern Railways, December 2014, Page 8.
Detailed description of the new trains with four illustrations and one diagram showing seating layout.

D78 stock conversion is “on”, Modern Railways, December 2014, page 36.
Full details of a proposal to convert LUL’s now redundant D78 rolling stock into two car diesel electric multiple units that could replace the unpopular Pacer stock.

Cinderella joins the ball, Modern Railways, December 2014, page 62.
Details of the long-planned electrification of the Midland Main Line north from Bedford to Sheffield with branches to Corby and Nottingham – which has now been given the go-ahead. Five illustrations and four diagrams which show the planned track layout along the route.

New Eurostar launched, Today’s Railways UK, January 2015, page 30.
Another article describing the new E320 trains, with four illustrations and a diagram displaying the seating layout.

Stadler sees a bigger Europe, Railway Gazette International, January 2015, page 28.
The Swiss rolling stock builder has expanded its business across Europe with Flirt and Kiss multiple unit trains delivered to twelve European countries. Future prospects considered.

IEP design awaits the acid test, Railway Gazette International, January 2015, page 32.
The first of the new train sets destined for the East Coast and Great Western main lines has been unveiled at Hitachi’s Kasado Works on |Honshu Island, Japan.    Various details of layout and catering service are still to be finalised.

Stronger together, Railway Gazette International,  January 2015, page 36.
Examination of the proposal for Chinese rolling stock companies CNR and CSR to amalgamate.  They would form the world’s largest rolling stock builder.

Eurostar unveils e320 and orders 7 more, Railway Gazette International, January 2015, page 42
A look at Eurostar’s development plans involving refurbishment of some old stock and the introduction of brand new trains.

Eurostar unveils new “E320”,   Modern Railways, December 2014, Page 8.
Detailed description of the new trains with four illustrations and one diagram showing seating layout.

D78 stock conversion is “on”,  Modern Railways, December 2014, page 36.
Full details of a proposal to convert LUL’s now redundant D78 rolling stock into two car diesel electric multiple units that could replace the unpopular Pacer stock.

Cinderella joins the ball,  Modern Railways, December 2014, page 62.
Details of the long-planned electrification of the Midland Main Line north from Bedford to Sheffield with branches to Corby and Nottingham – which has now been given the go-ahead. Five illustrations and four diagrams which show the planned track layout along the route.

Light rail at the heart of “hub and spoke” approach to HS2,  Rail 24 December 2014, page 34.
Discussion about desire of metropolitan regions in England to obtain transport planning powers that would enable them to plan light rail networks feeding the planned HS2 railway.

New Eurostar launched,  Today’s Railways UK, January 2015, page 30.
Another article describing the new E320 trains, with four illustrations and a diagram displaying the seating layout.

Stadler sees a bigger Europe, Railway Gazette International, January 2015, page 28.
The Swiss rolling stock builder has expanded its business across Europe with Flirt and Kiss multiple unit trains delivered to twelve European countries. Future prospects considered.

IEP design awaits the acid test, Railway Gazette International, January 2015, page 32.
The first of the new train sets destined for the East Coast and Great Western main lines has been unveiled at Hitachi’s Kasado Works on |Honshu Island, Japan.    Various details of layout and catering service are still to be finalised.

Stronger together,  Railway Gazette International,  January 2015, page 36.
Examination of the proposal for Chinese rolling stock companies CNR and CSR to amalgamate.  They would form the world’s largest rolling stock builder.

Eurostar unveils e320 and orders 7 more, Railway Gazette International, January 2015, page 42
A look at Eurostar’s development plans involving refurbishment of some old stock and the introduction of brand new trains.

Lyria celebrates 30 years,  Today’s Railways Europe, January 2015, page 24.
French and Swiss Railways set  up a joint company, Lyria, thirty years ago to operate through services between Paris and Lausanne cutting an hour off the previous best times.   Traffic increased by 165% during the first year of operation.   The article examines the further progress and plans of the company extending services to additional Swiss destinations.

Endangered species: Mat ’64,  Today’s Railways Europe, January 2015, page 44.
The ’64 class of emus is the last of a series of classes of streamlined emus and is now nearing withdrawal.   The article includes a history of the class and gives an indication of where the last units in service may be found.   Eight illustrations.

AC or DC – that is the question, Railways Illustrated, February 2015, page 40.
Long presentation of the question thrown up in the Modernisation Plan of 1955 in which considerable electrification was proposed.   Low voltage DC schemes would require the costly building of substation every 5 or 6 miles in order to maintain a high enough voltage along the route.   High voltage AC schemes would require more headroom between the power wires and overhead structures including bridges, tunnels, and other structures, and this required substantial capital expenditure but when completed the operating costs of the high voltage railway were lower.

The articles goes on to examine the several different AC locomotives built to examine the qualities of each with a view to deciding the builder of a large fleet.

Fifty years of the Skokie Swift,   Passenger Train Journal,  Issue 2014/4, page 16.
Following the abandonment of the North Shore interurban in January 1963, the fast shuttle between Howard Street and Skokie Dempster Street was introduced by the Chicago Transit Authority on 20 April 1964.   Rail service was restored to communities that had once enjoyed service from the interurban.   Sixteen illustrations, one map.

The later ac electrics,  Traction,  January/February 2015, page 20.
Review of classes 90, 91, and 92 with description of how and where they are used.   Mention of class 93 which was part of the InterCity 250 proposal which never received Government funding.

Thameslink on Time, Modern Railways, February 2016, page 46.
Progress report on this massive project including the rebuilding work at London Bridge Station.    There are 8 illustrations, old and new track layouts and traffic flow illustration at London Bridge, and a diagram of the future pattern of services along the Thameslink routes.

London Special, Rail, 4 February 2015, 34 page supplement published with Bombardier.
Topics include Improvements made to operation of Victoria Line; Success of S-Stock S7 and S8 trains; Description of Crossrail 2 plans; the New Tube for London Project.

New year; new lines, Railway Gazette International, February 2015, page 30.
One tram and eleven metro projects in China were completed in December 2014.   Details given supplemented by a very helpful metro/light rail map of Beijing.

Northern Line projects boost Underground capacity, Railway Gazette International, February 2015, page 34
With the Northern Line carrying nearly 1m passengers per day, and with traffic still rising, a series of improvements are described including resignalling to boost service frequency.

The most prolific year, Railway Gazette International , February 2015, page 53.
More than 3000 route km has been added to the Chinese main line network, mostly high-speed lines.   Includes very useful map showing the new high-speed routes as well as the conventional main lines.

Joining the 200 km/h club, Railway Gazette International, February 2015, page 58.
Polish Railways have launched its first 200km/hour services from 14 December 2014 using twenty non-tilting Pendolino train sets.   Lines served include Warsaw to Krakow and Warsaw to Gdansk/ – Gdynia.

Wartime Plan for Electrification on the Southern 1944, CC1 Was the Answer, British Railways Illustrated, February 2015, page 188
Very detailed 12 page article on the electrification plans for the Southern Railway. It includes 20 b/w photos and a drawing of CC1.

North Eastern Electrics, End of a Bold Experiment, British Railways Illustrated, March 2015, page 272
Short article about the plans of the North Eastern Railway to electrify the York to Newcastle main line. It includes four b/w photos of the locomotives being scrapped, with extended captions.

Great Eastern Class 90s,  Back Track, March 2015, page 152.
Photo-feature with five colour views of Class 90 locomotives in different liveries taken during the transition period in 2003/4 when the earlier Class 86s were being phased out.

New traction for Central Line fleet, Modern Railways, March 2015, page 31.
Details of a proposal to re-engine the fleet of trains operating London Underground’s Central Line services.   The existing DC engines would be replaced  by new AC equipment.

Hull to Selby. Privately-funded wiring?, Modern Railways, March 2015, page 51.
An investigation of the possible electrification of a line linking Hull with the ECML, by First Group at the Group’s expense.

Way forward for Wrexham?, Modern Railways, March 2015, page 54.
Comprehensive look at plans to upgrade services through Wrexham including third rail electrification to Liverpool via the Hawarden Bridge line, and 25 kV ac electrification to Chester and Crewe to give a link to the West Coast route.

Shinkansen in, Sleepers out, Railway Gazette International, March 2015, page 25.
Shinkansen services start between Tokyo and Kanazawa on 14 March 2015 upon opening of Hokiruko Shinkansen. The Twilight Sleeper service on the narrow gauge (1067mm) line between Osaka and Sapporo and the Tokyo – Sapporo Hokutosei sleeping car service are discontinued from the same date. The age of the sleeping cars used is given as a reason for the change.  The luxury tri-weekly Cassiopeia sleeping car train between Tokyo and Sapporo will continue at least until the Shinkansen is extended to Hakodate in March 2016.

Faster to the Gironde, Railway Gazette International, March 2015, page38.
Description of construction work taking the LGV Sud Europe Atlantique from Tours to Bordeaux. Detailed map that shows the many bridges and other structures that are on this route.

Great Eastern class 90s, Back Track, March 2015, page 152.
Photo-feature including five views of class 90 locomotives in five very different liveries reflecting the changes in TOCs operating on these lines.

15 Years of Passenger Service on the Erie Lackawanna, Passenger Train Journal,  No 1 of 2015,   page 30.
Detailed account of the suburban networks of the two constituent railways, diesel and electric, with detailed route map, and fifteen illustrations.

Twelve Northern lines to be electrified before 2024?, Rail, 18 March 2015, page 8.
Feature describing the network of routes across northern England between Liverpool, York and Hull that could be electrified before 2024 and possibly during the next few years.  Handy map.

Prospects for East Anglia, Rail, 18 March 2015, page 66.
Examination of the challenges facing the next holder of the East Anglia franchise.   Map shows the various routes covered ranging from Inter-City (London – Norwich), to suburban services, Stansted Express, and regional services in rural localities.    Numbers of travellers between key city pairs each weekday detailed with Norwich – London and Colchester – London by far the largest.

On the Wight track, Rail, 18 March  2015, page 73.
Description of the complex works to repair storm damage to “The Island Line” that have involved a ten week closure of the railway south of Ryde St Johns Road.    A single unit of 76 year old ex-London Underground stock has maintained an hourly shuttle between St Johns Road and Ryde Pier Head.  Map and six illustrations.

The Woes of Westinghouse, Back Track, April 2015, page 228
Long account of the early years of the company’s operations in the UK including the construction of rolling stock for the Mersey Railway, the Metropolitan Railway, and the Lancaster – Morecambe – Heysham service.   The problems with the Lots Road power station are also examined in detail.

Mariazellerbahn: Modernised but still charming, Today’s Railways Europe, April 2015, page 34
Detailed account of the 760mm gauge Austrian line operating from St Polten, where it connects with the Westbahn, to Mariazell (84km).   The first sections opened in 1898 using steam power with electrification coming in 1909.  Stadler emus took over from 2010.   Six illustrations and two maps.

Gotthard Pass Cab Ride, Trains, March 2015, page 34
Description of ride along the historic Gotthard Pass route.   Nine illustrations plus map showing the traditional route which includes the famous tunnel, and also the Base Tunnel route that will run straight under the mountains in a new very long tunnel.

The $10.8bn bore, Trains, March 2015, page 38.
Detailed article describing the task of linking the Long Island RR in Queens with an expanded Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan, New York.   Nine illustrations depicting the construction work which is now at an advanced stage.    Two detailed diagrams illustrating how the new Grand Central platforms will be laid out.

The Anglian AC changeover, Railways Illustrated, April 2015, page 38.
Long article recalling the problems of getting electric services to Norwich operating reliably.  Numerous failures of class 86 electric locomotives caused many service upsets.

Wonderful  Waverley, Rail, 1 April 2015, page 72.
Account of the work completed so far on the major upgrade to Edinburgh’s principal main line station.    The £130m project has seen the replacement of the massive roof, the creation of a new entrance from Market Street, the refurbishment of the main concourse.  The provision of lifts to the bridge across the concourse, and of covered escalators up the “Waverley Steps” to Princes Street have proved to be especially welcomed by the users.    The booking hall has been fitted out by many seats where passengers are now bathed in light streaming through the refurbished ceiling.   Eight illustrations.

Cross-Tokyo link completed, Railway Gazette International, April 2015, page 43.
Additional tracks have been built above the Tohoku Shinkansen to create the 3.8 km long 1067mm gauge Ueno – Tokyo Line which was opened on 14 March 2015.    The job was immensely complicated since the new structure creating space for double-deck commuter cars had be fitted in between existing structures.    Six illustrations, two diagrams.

Northern Sparks: Electrification for economic growth, Today’s Railways UK,  May 2015, page 48
Review of long-term plans with proposals for electrification of thirty two lines grouped into three tiers to indicate the priority of the plans.

Proud Preston:  A station for the 21st century,  Today’s Railways UK, May 2015, page 54.
History and review of services at this Northern Hub on the West Coast Main Line.   Eleven illustrations, track diagram, and two tables to show service patterns.

On track for Thameslink,  Rail, 15 April 2015, page 46
Detailed article describing a visit to the Siemens Krefeld factory and their Wildenrath Test Track, to observe progress being made with the construction of the new class 700 emus that are being built for Thameslink.   Twelve illustrations and one location map.

How the West will win with new trains, Rail, 15 April 2015, page 58.
Information on how services in many parts of the country will be improved once the Great Western main line is electrified through a series of cascades of older stock to operating companies across the nation.   Eight illustrations.

Endangered Species: OBB Class 1142,  Today’s Railways Europe,  May 2015, page 28.
The introduction of Desiro emus and planned new electric locos for freight services will see a major decline in the use of these about 50 years old locomotives.   Seven illustrations.

Genève: A Swiss part of France?  Today’s Railways Europe,  May 2015, page 32.
Major article describing railway activity around Geneva including planned new lines.   Map and seventeen illustrations (some monochrome historic scenes).

LU Sub-surface signalling twice the price and 4 years late, Modern Railways, May 2015, page 34.
The title says it all.  Bombardier won this contract but then withdrew.   The contract price then rose substantially and the timescale became severely extended.

A Railway for everyone, Railway Gazette International, May 2015, page 31.
To mark the start of the new Scotrail franchise on 1 April 2015, this article features the range of services operated including complex suburban networks across the central belt, to long distance interurban expresses and long extremely rural routes extending into the south west and north west corners of Scotland.    Four illustrations.

Class 700 is on track, Railway Gazette International, May 2015, page 44.
The first of the 115 class 700 emus being built in Germany has arrived in England for testing on the Thameslink route.   The 700s have been designed to take over the complex network of services that will use the Thameslink route.   Seven illustrations.

The ASEA electric locomotive family, Traction,  May/June 2015, page 36
Photofeature including twenty one illustrations of the family of locomotives that were sold to many nations across Europe but made little impact in the UK.

The Quintinshill firestorm, Life and Work, May 2015,  page 32.
Description and comment from a rather different viewpoint compared with the usual railway enthusiast magazines of Britain’s worst ever railway accident 100 years ago on 22 May 1915. Description of the rescue efforts and the mass burial at Rosebank Cemetery in Edinburgh near where most of the dead soldiers had lived.   Arrangements for commemoration events marking the centenary described.   Three illustrations.

East  from  Brighton. Today’s Railways UK,  June 2015, page 42.
Long description of the routes and services east from Brighton to Eastbourne (and Hastings) plus the Newhaven and Seaford branch.  Thirteen illustrations, track plan of much of these routes, and a table detailing the number of passengers using each station.

Brussels Regional Network, Today’s Railways Europe,  June 2015, page 6.
Short descriptive article giving an update to plans to reorganise services around the Belgian capital.   Include full page coloured diagram of the Brussels suburban rail, metro, and pre-metro networks.

The BLS Blue Arrows: Economy, Elegance and Endurance, Today’s Railways Europe, June 2015, page 22.
Detailed article concerning the family of stylish emus introduced in the 1930s as an economy measure.   Eight models were eventually produced with the last withdrawn from normal traffic in 2005 although one unit remains for charter purposes.    Fourteen illustrations.

CORROSION  Bakerloo  fleet suffers, Modern Railways, June 2015, page26.
Substantial corrosion problems have been found in the thirty six 7-car trains that work the services on LUL’s Bakerloo Line.    Dating from 1972, these are the oldest trains operating on a public railway in Britain and they will have reached an ago of around fifty before planned replacement takes place.     Some corrosion problems were discovered a few years ago and a detailed study has been undertaken on three trains to determine such factors as body strength in the event of a collision.   Details of the corrosion found and the extent of remedial work undertaken are presented.
Four illustrations.

Cutting queues at the Bank, Modern Railways, June 2015, page 56.
An examination of the overcrowding problems at LUL’s most congested station – Bank.   The work under way to relieve the problem is described together with a helpful diagram.

Growth for London Overground, Modern Railways, June 2015, page 56.
Review of how the London Overground has grown to six routes and will be extended significantly as several routes in North East London were added at the end of May 2015.    Tables show how traffic on Overground lines has increased during the period 2006-2014 (often doubles or trebled and as high as 716% on the West London Line).   Other tables include interchange station growth.   Good diagram of planned Overground network by 2026.   Three illustrations.

Tube modernisation meets signalling stumbling blocks, Rail, 27 May 2015,
page 32.
As traffic continues to rise various measures have been taken to boost capacity ranging from new trains, the possibility of train cooling systems to make travelling conditions better, and additional passageways at congested stations.   The article identifies one area where little progress has been achieved – a completely new signalling system for the sub-surface lines.   The tendering process has hit problems as appropriate suggestions have not been made by signalling firms.

Why electrification?, Rail, Electrification Special section, 27 May 2015, page 4.
This the first of a series of articles looking at a wide range of topics  in this 32 page supplement.

Consultants to report next year on Gautrain Extensions, Railway Gazette International, June 2015, page 45.
Details of possible extensions to the Gautrain network that links Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Tambo International Airport to reach outer suburban destinations in all directions. Map.

Success story for Staffordshire, Modern Railways, July 2015, page 62
Details of how the flyover at Norton Bridge is being built.  Two track diagrams, seven illustrations.

Virgin grapples with growth, Modern Railways, July 2015, page 68.
Description of how additional accommodation is being provided for standard class passengers. Four illustrations.

High Speed, Railway Gazette International, July 2015, page 31.
Sixteen pages of nine mostly short articles examining the progress made with building high-speed railways across the world. Sixteen photographs, two maps, several tables.

Railways in Berlin: Part three – new railways and heritage, Today’s Railways Europe July 2015, page 22.
Detailed description of lines recently built or planned.   2 maps.  11 illustrations.

Le Petit Train Jaune, Today’s Railways Europe, July 2015, page 34.
Excellent description of this metre gauge line linking Villefranche with Latour de Carol.   This line has major potential to attract tourist traffic but at the moment is a major money loser.  It is still operated by the original 1909 stock which takes power at 850 V dc through a third rail.   There is now a serious possibility that the railway will be closed.  Map.  Eleven photographs.

Note: Searching on YouTube for the above title brings up many video clips of the line.

TfL on the March, Today’s Railways UK, August 2015, page 48.
Long article describing the steady increase over a period of several years in Transport for London’s involvement in the operation of commuter railways around the city.   The takeover of Liverpool Street to the north eastern suburban lines is simply the most recent of a series of absorptions into the Overground.    The article surveys takeovers going back to July 1933 and the co-ordination of Underground, bus, and tram services.   Six illustrations.

The knock-on benefits of “Norwich in 90”, Rail, 22 July 2015, page 46.
Long article assessing the need for a major upgrade to the London Liverpool Street – Norwich 115 mile long route along which the half-hourly services take around 1 hour 20-25 minutes.    The locomotives and Mark 3 coaches are now around 35 years old.   The track needs to be improved and the trains themselves need to be renewed to give a smarter performance with the running time reduced to 90 minutes. Map and six illustrations.

Trains from Paris Austerlitz, Today’s Railways Europe, August 2015, page 24,
Long detailed article describing the services that still use the Austerlitz terminus in Paris.   This is the only terminus in the city that has lost traffic during recent years due to the diversion of some routes to other termini.  There are prospects for a limited revival of some other routes.    Fifteen illustrations (including passenger, freight, and one of LRVs), two maps and one table that lists the considerable number of long distance trains that still use the station.   

Supertrams come to Britain, Back Track, August 2015, page 497.
This superb long article has the subtitle “The origins and development of the Tyne and Wear Metro” which accurately describes this article.   In 2014 was the 30th anniversary of the opening of the first section of the Metro which was developed out of a failing local railway system.  The Beeching Report had recommended that co-ordinated local rail and road transport should be developed in localities where suburban heavy rail routes were hopelessly uneconomic and the response in Newcastle and Gateshead was to bring their local rail services into the town centres by building new tunnel sections and operate much more frequent services using new “lightish” rail cars.   There follows a full description of the politics involved, and the construction and operation of the system including the changing liveries.   Two maps show the initial planned system and the more extensive network actually built.   The twelve illustrations include the two electric locos that operated the Quayside branch, the articulated Metro-Cammell stock of 1937, and the test centre where much development work was achieved before the Metro opened.  Three tables give opening dates for each section and various statistics.

Longest tunnel will transform transalpine traffic flows, Railway Gazette International, August 2015, page 46.
Discussion about possible alterations to traditional services once the two Base Tunnels on the Gotthard route have opened.

Moving freight across the mountains, Railway Gazette International, August 2015, page 50.
Freight traffic across south-east Europe will be greatly changed once a series of major infrastructure projects are completed during the next decade in Eastern Switzerland.

Heavy haul electric on test, Railway Gazette International, August 2015, page 64.
Heavy coal traffic is to be handled by rail between mines in the Shanxi Province of China to destinations along the eastern seaboard.   The Shanxi area has been opened up by the building of a new railway, 1216 km long, and electrified at 25 kV 50 Hz.    A prototype new design of locomotive, the HXD2F, is now being tested on the new railway and will haul long coal trains at up to 100 km/hour.

End of the line for South West Trains?, Rail, 5 August 2013, page 56
The problems facing Stagecoach’s South West Trains as the company failed to win a two year extension to its franchise at a time when major developments at Waterloo require management stability.    Ten illustrations.

50 years and still going strong, Railway Magazine, August 2015, page 18.
Detailed account of the Class 86 electric locomotives of which 100 were built.   A table details the whereabouts of the 41 survivors of which eight are at work in Hungary, 20 are in use or are capable of use in the UK.    Nine illustrations.

Exploring West London by District Line, Today’s Railways UK, September 2015, page 28.
Detailed history of the routes from Earls Court to Ealing Broadway, Richmond, and Wimbledon seventeen illustrations and one diagrammatic route map.

Eastwards from Eastbourne, Today’s Railways UK, September 2015, page 54.
Good description of the route between Eastbourne, Hastings and Ore, plus the Hastings Cliff Lifts. Fourteen illustrations, track diagram, and table detailing current station usage.  Two of the stops have very little traffic indeed but the others are well supported by the local communities.  There are useful tips regarding places to visit from some of the stations.   Information is given about the aims of the Bexhill Rail Action Group which was formed in 2005 when there was a proposal to cease the operation of through trains to London via Haywards Heath.    

The iron ore giants, Traction, September/October 2015, page 20.
Description of the railway that handles the massive iron ore traffic between Kiruna in Sweden and the all-weather port of Narvik in Norway.      A table lists basic information about the four locomotive types that haul Europe’s heaviest freight trains.  Eleven illustrations.

Performance cinderellas, Traction, September /October 2015, page 44.
Details of several brisk runs given by the often ignored SUB and EPB emus.

Streetcar named high tech, Trains, August 2015, page 32.
Detailed look at the Alstom Citadis trams that have been introduced on the Dubai light rail system. The trams feature many high tech features and have a very stylish external appearance.  Ten illustrations and one map showing the tram route twisting around the new living areas alongside the waterfront.

A Snapshot of the Hong Kong Tramways, Locomotives International, August/September 2015, page 11.
Short history of the tramway which now has the largest (163) fleet of double-deck trams in the world.   Although new trams with a similar external appearance but improved interior fittings now operate, traffic on the system has fallen by 10% since the West Island Line of the Metro opened  in December 2014.    Nine illustrations.

Timber and electricity in Slovakia: the Lubochea – Macidlo Forestery railway, Locomotives International, August/September 2015, page 50.
550V dc line opened in 1904 and closed in 1966, which once carried heavy timber trains plus a minimal passenger service during its final years.   Locomotives include two early Ganz locomotives and one AEG machine.   Twelve illustrations and one small map.

Crossrail’s success, Rail, 19 August 2015.  Sixteen page supplement.
Four separate articles that examine different aspects of the massive construction challenges that have been overcome.

All change on the Midland Metro, Rail, 19 August 2015, page 54.
Detailed account of the original fleet of trams – the T69s – and their different liveries.  Thirteen illustrations with good views of the standard NX livery, tram 11 in the historic Birmingham Corporation tram livery which it received to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the closure of the trams, and of trams in the silver and magenta (pink) livery including No 10 named after local tram historian John Stanley Webb.    Tables list the names given to fourteen of the sixteen trams, with information about the date on which trams were put into store as the new CAF Urbos trams took over operations.   Good map.

A year to photograph the Gotthard Summit route, Today’s Railways Europe, September 2015, page 20.
Long detailed account about what will happen in December 2016 when the new Gotthard Base Tunnel becomes used by the majority of passenger and freight trains using the Gotthard route.  The present traffic is described stressing the point that the route is the busiest freight route for traffic between Germany and Italy.   The Base Tunnel route will shorten the distance between Zurich and Milan by about 30 km but the new tunnel will allow passengers expresses to run at 250 km/hour compared with 90 km/hour over the old line.   45 minutes will be cut from the journey time making rail competitive with the rival air service.   Most passenger services will switch to the new line in December 2016 and others will transfer a year later.    In the long term the old line with its scenic twists and turns at Wassen will be used by SBB Historic’s heritage trains.    Eleven illustrations. Detailed map in two sections plus detailed maps of three complex sections.     Diagrammatic gradient profile.

TFT: Regional suburban or museum line, Today’s Railways Europe, September 2015, page 30.
Description of a local route in northern Italy worked by a very mixed bag of locomotives and emus. Seven illustrations.  

EGIP gathers pace, Modern Railways, September 2015, page 50.
Fairly detailed article about the transformation of the Edinburgh – Glasgow main line including many details of the alternative routes used during the closure of some sections for electrification work.   Six illustrations, one map.

New era for c-2-c, Modern Railways, September 2015, page 68.
Comprehensive look at a wide range on improvements that National Express plans to introduce during its new 15 year franchise for services on the LT&S routes from London Fenchurch Street.  Six illustrations and tiny outline route map.

ECML: the promised land – – – -, Rail, 2 September 2015,  page 54.
An account of how with each letting of the franchise to operate services between Kings Cross, Leeds, and Edinburgh, there were promises of new trains, faster speeds, and many additional trains.   The article shows that most promises were either not kept or were partially fulfilled many years later.

Manchester sharpens its rail ambitions, Rail, 2 September 2015, page 62.
The city has published a 25-year Transport Vision for comments by the citizens.   The background to the present situation of heavy rail services around the city is explained.    Transport improvements are seen as a catalyst to new development and regeneration across the city as a whole and it is considered important to have achieved significant improvements to the local rail network before HS2 arrives.    Seven illustrations.

London Bridge is constantly evolving, Rail, 2 September 2015, page 70.
A look at the history and on-going transformation of the London station.  Seven illustrations.

Man and a van, Rail Express, September 2015, page 16.
Selection of photographs of class 87 locomotives at work in Bulgaria to show the various liveries used on the 87s.   Over half of the class 87 machines are now in use in Bulgaria.

ECTS and ATO through the Thameslink core, Railway Gazette International,      September 2015,  page 33.
Description of the new signalling systems that are being installed along the high-capacity two minute frequency, cross-London services which will be introduced in 2018.   Nine illustrations, one map, and one diagram.

Solving the Thameslink puzzle, Today’s Railways UK   October 2015, page 30.
To coincide with the delivery of the first of the class 700 emus that will operate the new services, this article examines the practicality of operating 24 trains per hour through the heart of London. Six illustrations.

What next for the Isle of Wight?, Today’s Railways UK, October 2015, page 54.
The article examines the various options and prospects for the Ryde – Shanklin line in an era when many fewer people are taking their annual holiday there.   Major repairs and upgrades if the 8½ mile line is to survive as the South West Trains franchise comes close to its renewal date.   The use of former London Underground stock has solved the problem of the low headroom through Ryde Esplanade Tunnel, but this stock has now a limited lifespan.  Options examined include a takeover by the operator of the steam line which connects at Smallbrook Jct, or conversion to light rail standards using some of the as yet unused trams in Edinburgh.    Diagram to show existing track layout, plus five illustrations.

Basel: Switzerland’s tram capital, Today’s Railways Europe, October 2015, page 32.
The complex and very busy tram network in the Swiss city, which extends for short distances into Germany and France, is described together with the varied liveries used by the two operators.    Plans for the future are discussed.    Ten illustrations plus a diagrammatic map of the network showing how 16 + routes come together through the heart of the city where trams can be nose-to-tail at busy times.  

A Century of Catenary. Classic Trains, Fall of 2015, page 20.
Comprehensive history of the North East Corridor overhead wire electrification.   Linking New York with Washington and Harrisburg plus various suburban and less important cross-country routes, the first sections opened in 1915.    Among the stock used were the famous GG1 locomotives, and numerous classes of emu.   Twenty illustrations.  Map.

New Street, Birmingham’s beating heart, Railway Magazine, October 2015, page 50.
Description of the rebuilt concourse which gives massively increased space for passengers. Six illustrations.

NET gains in Nottingham,   Railway Magazine, October 2015, page 58.
Description of the two new routes serving southern parts of the city.  Map and five illustrations.

Exploring the Piccadilly Line,  Today’s Railways UK, November 2015, page 38.
Very long article detailing the history of this north – West End -west route and explaining the major growth in the traffic handled in the 1930s and 1970s.  Twenty illustrations plus a table of the traffic handled at each station along the route and two reproductions of official items.

Rail renaissance in the West Midlands,  Today’s Railways UK  November 2015, page 48.
The recent growth in traffic handled during recent years is seen as perhaps leading to the creation of a separate West Midlands franchise with local control for local railways.   Map plus five illustrations.

Overground rejuvenates the London suburbs, Rail Express, November 2015, page 18.
History of how suburban routes all around London have been linked to create new routes that have been rewarded by a massive growth in traffic.   Future prospects examined.  Route diagram and fourteen illustrations.

Brussels: a railfan guide,  Today’s Railways Europe,  November 2015, page 20.
Part one of a three part article in which the passenger services around the city are described in some detail.   Eleven illustrations.   Three tables summarising the services given.

Sweden celebrates electric centenary,   Today’s Railways Europe, November 2015, page 38.
The Swedish Railway Museum at Gävle organised a special exhibition on 12 September 2015 to mark the centenary of the electrification of the iron ore line linking Kiruna and Riksgränsen.   The five illustrations depict some of the historic locomotives that were on view.

Trent Valley triumph,  Modern Railways, November 2015, page 64.
Description of how the London Midland TOC has upgraded the stopping service along the Trent Valley section of the West Coast Main Line resulting in a spectacular increase in the number of passengers using the services.    Five illustrations plus three tables/diagrams to show the steady growth in traffic from 2009 until 2015.

Euston: council petition seeks full station integration,  Rail, 25 November 2015, page 38.
Account of various problem areas linked to the planned enlargement of Euston Station and its use by HS2.    The local Camden Council wishes to see proper integration between the expansion for HS2, the creation of Crossrail, and the need for sound insulation in at least 1000 homes in the neighbourhood.    Detailed map of the locality around Euston showing the extent of the enlargement.

On the trail of the tram-train,  Rail, 25 November 2015, page 64.
Report of a visit to the Vossloh factory in Valencia, Spain, to observe the progress being made to build seven three-section tram-trains for use in Sheffield.   Six illustrations and a table to indicate specified performance information.

HS2 Britain’s high-speed spine,  Modern Railways,  December 2015, page 51.
Fifteen page group of related articles examining various aspects of the plans for HS2 including “a railway for 2100”, “a very busy railway” in which capacity limitations along the route are examined, “redevelopment of Euston” in which the staged creation of a double-deck station is considered, “connecting the West Midlands” including a description of how Curzon Street H-S station will have two levels.

Gatwick Express trains prepare for take-off,  Today’s Railways UK, January 2016, page 60.
Feature about the new 387/2 emus being put together at Bombardier’s Derby factory.   Their bright red livery with grey doors is certainly eye-catching!     Ten illustrations.

All change at Ilford, Today’s Railways UK, February 2016, page 32.
Description of the major changes transforming Ilford Depot as it prepares to handle the new class 345 emus.   Twelve illustrations.

The renaissance of the Wellington tramways, Locos International, Dec 2015/Jan 2016, page 56.
Recent developments on the 4’0” gauge tramways in the NZ capital recorded.   December 2015 marked the 50th anniversary of the opening of the first section and the tramway was closed finally in may 1964.   A tramway museum was established in the Queen Elizabeth Park near Paekakariki, thirty miles north of Wellington and a working tramway now 2km long was built in stages during 1964-80.   There are now nine preserved trams there several of which operate on the tramway.

On the Rock, Railway Magazine, January 2016, page 20.
Long very well illustrated article (the first of a planned two) about rack and similar railways explaining the different deigns employed by different railway companies and then describing the different railways operating in Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. Twenty one illustrations, and three maps to show the location of the lines in each nation.

On the Rock, Railway Magazine, February 2016, page 38
Part two of description of rack and similar railways this time giving details of lines in the rest of the world.  

Vintage electric traction in China, Locomotives International, Jan/Feb 2016, page 8.
Three views of 1930s trams still hard at work in Dalian – though soon to be replaced by a Metro. Three views of railway locomotives – One on the Fushun Mining Coy’s railway and two of locos at Qian’n where machines from the 1940-50s still haul mineral trains.   Useful text.

Railways of Trondheim, Today’s Railways Europe,  February 2016, page 24.
Good survey of the railways radiating from Norway’s second largest city, 9 illustrations.

The world’s northernmost tramway, Today’s Railways Europe, February 2016, page 28.
Description of the tramway/light railway in Trondheim. Norway.   Detailed map and five photos.

The new Swiss timetable, Today’s Railways Europe, February 2016, page 38.
Major changes followed the completion of the Letzigraben Viaduct on the route from Zurich Hbf LL towards Bern and similarly of a chord just south of Zurich allowing more direct services towards Chur and Zug.    The effect of these improvements is shown in two maps, the changes are detailed Canton by Canton, and there are seven photographs.

100 not out, Modern Railway,  February 2016, page 48.
South West Trains has marked the centenary of the electrification of the  first part of its present day network.   The routes that were converted a century ago serve Kingston Richmond, Hounslow, Hampton Court and Shepperton.    SWT’s present day franchise has now celebrated its 20th anniversary.

London Special, Rail 3 February 2014, Thirty page supplement to the magazine.
Several different topics considered including the success of the S Stock for the Tube lines, and a discussion about Crossrail stock.   Forty illustrations.

Overhead electric military railway, Narrow Gauge World,  January/February 2016, page 30.
To aid the movement of supplies along a valley close to the front line, the Austro-Hungarian army built a 12.8km long 600 mm gauge railway between Bohinjska Bistrica and Zlatorog in what is today part of Slovenia.   The use of electric traction was seen as something that would enable steam power to be replaced and hundreds of miles of such lines were considered but the Simplex tractor was developed instead and this was the only electric line built.   Ganz supplied ten centre-cab four axle (two bogies) locos with power taken from an overhead wire by a large bow collector.   The railway was opened on 19 November 1917 but the front line then moved a considerable distance and the railway saw little use being dismantled in 1920.   Five illustrations and one map.

Renatus to be delivered in April, Today’s Railways UK,  February 2016, page 29.
Description of major upgrade to Class 321 emus, the first of which will be delivered for use this spring.    Nine illustrations.

Erfurt to Leipzig in 43 minutes, Today’s Railways Europe, March 2016, page 20
Description of the 123 km long high speed line that was opened on 9 December 2015 by the German Chancellor and commenced public services on 13 December 2015.    Erfurt – Berlin and Dresden – Frankfurt journeys are cut be 45 minutes and 1 hour respectively.  Eight illustrations and one detailed map.

The Crash That Began Railtrack’s Demise, Rail 2 March 2016,  page 48.
Account of the mail train crash at Rickerscote (Stafford – Wolverhampton line) on 8 March 1996.  Ten of the twenty three vans were derailed and the cause was found to be a defective axle on one vehicle.   The quality of Railtrack’s maintenance work was in part blamed and led to major changes to the structure of the railway industry.  Five main photographs plus two thumbnail shots of experts, map/track diagram of the affected area.

You’ve Got Mail Rail … Again, Rail 2 March 2016,  page 52.
Description of how a portion of the Post Office Railway that linked various sorting offices and two major stations, will be a key feature of the new Post Office Museum that will be created at the site of Mount Pleasant Sorting Office.    Five illustrations, small map of the Railway, and more detailed map of the sections of the route that will be used to give visitors to the Museum a ride on a short section of the railway.

Island Line’s Future Under the Spotlight, Rail 2 March 2016, page 56.
Detailed look at the problems facing the Island Line (Ryde – Shanklin on the Isle of Wight) with the limited headroom through Ryde Tunnel making it impossible to cascade stock from the BR network. The only way ahead would be to use trams/LRVs that have become available in recent years, such as the earlier fleet on Midland Metro.   At present ex-London Underground tube stock is used but there will not be more such stock available for many years and the present units cannot soldier on for much longer.  Seven main illustrations, map of the Isle of Wight showing the full extent of the railways that once linked all parts of the island.

TFL’s Idiom Adds to Capital’s Character, Rail 2 March 2016,  page 68.
London Transport’s  logo – a roundel with a bar across the middle – has become one of the most recognised family of transport signs in the world.    Different colours signify the type of transport involved – Bus, Underground train, ferry etc.     LUL is attempting to achieve a tidier uncluttered appearance with excess signs removed and those which remain placed carefully to be of maximum use and help. Five main illustrations.

New Look Station Will Be Fit for a Queen, Rail 2 March 2016,  page 72.
Description of the work that will transform Glasgow’s Queen Street (High Level) station in preparation for the introduction of emu services to Edinburgh.   There will be longer platforms, a redesigned concourse, and an ugly 1970s building will be removed so that more light will reach the concourse.   The glorious arched roof will be restored and will let much more light into the station. The station will be closed from 20 March until 8 August 2016 to allow the work to proceed unimpeded.    Trains that normally use the station will be diverted over slightly longer routes to the Low Level station or to Glasgow’s other great terminus – Central Station.   Seven illustrations and a track plan of the modernised station.

TPE Looks to the Future with New Franchise, Today’s Railways UK, April 2016  page 46.
Examination of TransPennine Express’s plans for its newly won franchise with a network of routes branching from the Manchester – Leeds – York core.   Five illustrations, one map.

Rails to Morecambe, Back Track, April 2016, page 198
Extremely long article giving a great deal of information about the various routes that have served this one-time key resort together with the nearby ferry port of Heysham.   Seventeen illustrations showing steam, diesel and electric trains, one map.

Kensal Green Interludes, British Railways Illustrated, April 2016, page 316
Six photos taken near Kensal Green in the 1950s and 1960s, two steam, two diesel and two nice photos of Oerlikon electric units which operated out of Euston and Broad Street at that time.

Central Line through the Heart of London, Today’s Railways UK, May 2016, page 42.
Ten page article covering the history of line starting as the “Twopenny Tube” then extended at both ends over existing steam railways.   Twelve photographs, two tables showing the varied destinations of the 24 services each off-peak hour at Liverpool Street station. (No map.)

Focus on Nuneaton, Today’s Railways UK, May 2016, page 52.
Fourteen page article highlighting the services operating through this key junction station where the West Coast Main Line (electrified) crosses the west – east main line between the West Midlands and the East Coast ports.   Fourteen illustrations, track map with indication of the tracks that are electrified, two tables listing calls by Virgin trains and the times of freight services passing through the station.

NSB Type 69 Emus, Traction, May/June 2016, page 38.
Description of the various versions of emus that were introduced during the 1970s.  They saw extensive service on suburban services operating around Norway’s major cities and also proved popular on tourist orientated services including the “Norway in a Nutshell” tour trains.

Light Rail Supplement, Rail, 27 April 2016, Supplement in centre of issue.
A 32 page well illustrated supplement dealing with many aspects of light rail developments in  England and Scotland.

MailRail: The London Post Office’s Own Railway, Gibbons Stamp Monthly, May 2016,  page 56 and part 2, June 2016, page 58
History of the line including mention of the earlier experimental line at Plumstead Marshes where some ideas for the railway were tested.

Churchill’s Secret Station, Railway Magazine, May 2016, page 38.
London Transport Museum has started tours of Down Street station (close to Hyde Park Corner) which was closed due to lack of traffic in 1932.    The deep placed station with its network of corridors was considered to be safe from the expected bombing in World War 2 and was converted into offices and a communications nerve centre used at times by Prime Minister Winston Churchill and by the Railway Executive Committee.   Mention made of other closed stations that have found new uses.  Eleven illustrations.

4 Year Plan to Transform the Railways of the North, Today’s Railways UK, June 2016, page 8.
Long news presentation describing the aims of the new franchises including the development of fast more frequent services between the main population centres, the development of new rolling stock (emus and dmus), and new liveries.   Five illustrations.

The West Coastway, Part 1 – Brighton – Littlehampton, Today’s Railways UK, June 2016, page 38.
Ten page article giving potted history of the route, description of service pattern, and description of each station from east to west, track plan of the route, and description of features along the way such as Lancing College and the Littlehampton Miniature Railway. Seventeen illustrations.

Great Western Main Line wires in use by this September, Rail, 11 May 2016, page  6.
News feature including detailed diagram of routes to be electrified together with guide as to when each section would be switched on.

Rail conquers the Alps,  Railway Gazette International, May 2016, commencing at page 53.
Set of seven detailed articles, one celebrating the opening of the Gotthard Base Tunnel on 1 June 2016, then two describing features of that tunnel, and finally articles considering the continuing policy of switching transit freight between Germany and Italy from road to rail, and the contribution of other base tunnels in this task.

A roam around Rome, Today’s Railways Europe, June 2016, page 24.
Long description of the railways around Rome with indications of interesting things to see and do. The eighteen illustrations show the wide variety of trains to be seen.  A helpful route map is included.

South Eastern at 180, Modern Railways, June 2016, page 46.
A summary of developments taking place on the Southeastern TOC’s network which had started as the London and Greenwich Railway 180 years ago.   Four illustrations plus detailed “before” and “after” track diagrams of the routes around and through London Bridge station.

London Special, Modern Railways, June 2016, pages 51 – 71.
A series of reports/articles dealing with some of the complex developments taking place on London’s railway network.    Notable among these is “Turning South London Orange” (pages 62-65) a proposal to extend the Overground type of upgrade to railways to Croydon and Epsom. Four illustrations and three route diagrams.

Station designs unveiled, Modern Railways, June 2016, page 94.
With Crossrail due to open in under three years, information about the design of some of the stations is revealed.   The stations will be spacious and capable of handling the vast crowds that will use the new railway.

Why the APT did not prove sufficiently apt, Rail, 22 June 2016, page 66.
This interesting article takes a detailed look at an important chapter in train development.   BR undertook research in the late 1960s to design a train capable of higher speeds on existing track and with the existing signalling.    The result was the APT with a tilt capability.    Cash limitations prevented the completion of the research and parallel work produced the HST with its excellent performance ability.   Today parts of the APT design can be seen in the successful Class 390 Pendolino trains and class 221 Super Voyager sets.  

Murphy’s Law: class 84, Back Track, July 2016, page 395
An analysis of the problems encountered with the five classes (81-85) of 25kV locomotive built by different locomotive suppliers to work on the West Coast route the first parts of which were then being electrified.     Of the five, class 84 (initially described as Class AL4) proved to be the most unreliable developing multiple faults, the worst and most persistent involving the rectifiers.  Five illustrations plus one plan.

Emile Bachalet and the dawn of the “Maglev” – Part 1, Back Track, July 2016. page 440
Description of this engineer’s work to design an elevated transport system and the model which he built to demonstrate his ideas to others. Eight illustrations.

Endangered Species:  DB class 151 and 155 six axle electrics, Today’s Railways Europe, July 2016, page 24.
Between 1957 and 1973 one hundred and seventy class 151 locos were built by three locomotive builders to handle growing heavy freight traffic.    As the electrification of more and more routes was undertaken more locomotives were required – for freight and often secondary passenger duties and classes 155 and 250 were built.    In recent years new TRAXX locos have taken over more and more of the heavy freight duties and some of the 151s have been sold to other operators.   Banking duties are the major activity for surviving 151s today and these locos are now nearing the end of their productive lives.

Southern strikes: a route in crisis,  Rail, 6 July 2016, page 76.
Assessment of the complicated dispute concerning the introduction of Driver Only Operation (DOO) and the strike action that is now underway against both the Southern TOC and Scotrail.

Safety studies reveal that DOO need not be dangerous, Rail, 6 July 2016, page 88.
More detailed analysis of the issues involved in the dispute that threatens operations on the Southern TOC and the Scotrail TOC both of which have many services operated by the driver only.

Nothing ‘boring’ here,  Trains, July 2016, page 12.
Short description of the opening of the 35.4 mile long Gotthard Base Tunnel – described as longer than the five longest North American railroad tunnels combined.   Two illustrations.  One map.

Commuter  rail:  “FrontRunner”, Trains, July 2016, page 22.
This issue of “Trains” features three articles on commuter rail services in the USA and this first article describes the suburban rail services north and south of Utah’s State capital Salt Lake City. Six illustrations, one map, one diagram.   This is shown to be a most attractive looking system with double deck coaches and the mountains in the background.   Mention made of the city’s new light rail system.

Regional service, national asset, Trains, July 2016, page 28
Survey of how suburban railway services emerged in the 19th century, and how funding for these loss-making services has developed with today major contributions from the Federal Highway Trust Fund, and from the local communities served.    As an example of the complex budget that is involved, the Virginia Railway Express Budget for the current year is given in a table.   Ten photos of widely scattered operations.

Map of the month:  North American Commuter Rail, Trains, July 2016, page 36
Diagrammatic map of the USA shows the location of the widely scattered systems.   Alongside is a table listing the 25 operations in the USA with the route miles operated by each, the number of stations served, the average number of weekday riders, and the year that the service started.  A similar table gives the same information for the three operations operating in Canada.

Concern as EGIP electrification falls behind schedule, Rail, 20 July 2016,
page 10.
The Scottish Government has expressed concern as the start date for electric services between Edinburgh and Glasgow is pushed back to July 2017 from December 2016.

The standard bearers for a new generation of rolling stock, Rail, 20 July 2016, page 34.
At a time when standardisation of train types is seen as the way ahead to reduce maintenance costs the fact that there are 37 different types of emu currently in service shows how much remains to be done.

Leeds is back at a rail crossroads, Rail, 20 July 2016, page46.
There have been several plans to reorganise public transport around Leeds, some involving trams then trolleybuses. All have failed to proceed and now there are suggestions about a possible tram-train system that would use the Harrogate line (with Horsforth – Airport branch) then the branch across to York, and finally a route through York to Copmanthorpe.    Five illustrations, two maps/diagrams.

West Midlands rail awaits its next great leap forwards, Rail, 20 July 2016,
page 60.
Consideration of how extra trains can be squeezed into the city centre now that the New Street major upgrade has been completed.    Enlargement of Snow Hill station is considered and the building of the Bordesley Chords with the reopening of the Camp Hill Line are among ideas mentioned.

Newton Station’s blackest day, Rail, 20 July 2016, page 62.
Two emus were in collision 25 years ago at the complex junction east of Glasgow where lines from Glasgow (direct) and via Kirkhill come together and then split into routes to Motherwell and Hamilton.  The collision took place just west of the station where the track layout had recently been simplified into a single lead junction. The accident caused BR to reconsider its policy and led to the restoration of sections of track at many junctions including the one at Newton.

UK electrics in Bulgaria, Today’s Railways UK, September 2016, page 46.
During the past ten years twenty eight class 86 and 87 electric locomotives have been exported to Bulgaria by Europhoenix plus four class 92s.    Various modifications are required before the locomotives can be used in Bulgaria and this work is undertaken by the private company Express Services.   The modified/upgraded locos are used across the national rail network on freight services of which details are given. Six illustrations.

BR Southern Region emus, Modern Locomotives Illustrated, August/September 2016.
The entire 82 pages of this issue are used to describe and illustrate the numerous classes of emu at present in service on the third rail network south of London.    There are seventeen sections with each devoted to a class or group of closely related classes of emu.    The routes upon which they operate are detailed and substantial tables give large amounts of information including building dates, modernisation dates, dimensions and weight of each coach, traction motor details, internal layout, seating details, and weight of each coach in a set.   The publication is profusely illustrated.

First SWT Class 707s unveiled, Today’s Railways UK, September 2016, page 40.
Thirty five-car emus were ordered in September 2014 for use on Waterloo suburban routes which have shown 68% passenger growth during the franchise period making it necessary to augment the emu fleet.   The first 707 was unveiled at the Wildenrath Test Centre in Germany on 15 July 2016.     Fourteen illustrations which show the view right through the length of the train and the seating layouts.   Several show class 700 and 707 units under construction in Krefeld.

Tyneside Electric Train Working, Back Track, September 2016, page 516.
The article describes how timetable planners achieved regular frequent services “to the Coast” with extra peak services for growing numbers of commuters.    These trains were skillfully fitted between East Coast main line expresses and heavy freight traffic to industries along both banks of the Tyne. Seven illustrations, one route diagram, three tables.

Closing the Gap, Back Track, September 2016, page 536.
History of the Staines – Wokingham line of the London and South Western Railway which was opened in July 1856.    Details of history, services, electrification, and deve3lopments such as the transformation of freight yards into car parks for the ever growing commuter traffic.   Fourteen illustrations and map.

Four new high-speed lines – in 18 months!, Today’s Railways Europe, September 2016, page 20.
Long very well illustrated article including numerous maps and track diagrams describing four extensions totalling 650 route km to the French high-speed network.    These will all open during the next 12 – 18 months and are the LGV Est into Strasbourg; the LGV BPL operating from near Le Mans to Rennes;  the LGV Sud Europe Atlantique extending 300 km from the end of the LGV Atlantique near Tours to Bordeaux;and finally the Nimes – Montpellier bypassing the congested areas around Nimes and Montpellier stations on the classic railway lines.

London Bridge moves on, Modern Railways, September 2016, page 60.
Details of the work to transform the London terminal.   Six illustrations plus track diagram covering the lines from the New Cross area, through London Bridge to the terminals at Charing Cross, Blackfriars and Cannon Street.

The new Kansas City Star, Passenger Train Journal, issue three of 2016, page 18.
Report of the opening of the 2.2 mile long tramway in Kansas City, operating across the city centre from Union Station with the River Market area.   Nearly 382,000 people rode the trams during the first two months of operation.    It is hoped that this short line will be the start of a city-wide network.

Denver’s commuter rail awakening, Passenger Train Journal, issue 3 of 2016,
page 20.
Denver Union Station, until recently used by a single Amtrak train daily, is now alive with passengers all day long following the opening on 22 April 2016 of the first suburban route – Line A – operating 23 miles through suburbia to the International Airport.   The first six mile long section of Line B, running into the north west suburbs opens during 2016, as will the third route – the “Gold Line” may also open during 2016.    Hyundai-Rotem emus, built in Philadelphia, take power at 750V dc from an overhead wire.   Five illustrations.

Tyneside Electric Train Working, Back Track, September 2016, page 516
An article describing the workings of the electric suburban services around Newcastle with a short historical introduction. There are seven photos (two in colour) plus a route diagram and three tables of statistics.

Closing the Gap: The First 150 Years of the Staines to Wokingham Line, Back Track, September 2016, page 536
An article detailing the history and services of this line, electrified in the late 1930s. There are 14 photos (7 in colour) plus a map of the line.

London Bridge moves on, Modern Railways, September 2016, page 60.
Details of the work to transform the London terminal.   Six illustrations plus track diagram covering the lines from the New Cross area, through London Bridge to the terminals at Charing Cross, Blackfriars and Cannon Street.

The new Kansas City Star, Passenger Train Journal, issue three of 2016, page 18.
Report of the opening of the 2.2 mile long tramway in Kansas City, operating across the city centre from Union Station to the River Market area.   Nearly 382,000 people road the trams during the first two months of operation.    It is hoped that this short line will be the start of a city-wide network.

Denver’s commuter rail awakening, Passenger Train Journal, issue 3 of 2016,
page 20.
Denver Union Station, until recently used by a single Amtrak train daily, is now alive with passengers all day long following the opening on 22 April 2016 of the first suburban route – Line A – operating 23 miles through suburbia to the International Airport.   The first six mile long section of Line B, running into the north west suburbs opens during 2016, as will the third route – the “Gold Line” may also open during 2016. Hyundai-Rotem emus, built in Philadelphia, take power at 750V dc from an overhead wire.   Five illustrations.

Controlling  the  Corridor, Trains, September 2016, page 38.
The route along the east coast of USA between Boston, New York, and Washington is used by 870 trains every day.   How services are managed along the nation’s busiest railway route is described. Six illustrations and one diagrammatic map.

The New South Wales 46 Class electric locomotives, Traction, September/October 2016, page 48.
Forty Co+Co locomotives were ordered in 1949 to work on the newly electrified Western main line from Sydney, through the mountains to Lithgow.   They were to see service later on the main lines north towards Brisbane, south west towards Melbourne, and south to Nowra.    Used on passenger and some freight services, their use become more and more on heavy freights following the withdrawal of most of the passenger trains.    Some were withdrawn in the late 1980s and the last in 1996, but five have been preserved by enthusiast bodies and one operates special services over main lines several times a year.

Building the Vectron, Today’s Railways Europe, October 2016, page 23.
Long article describing the design, planning, and construction of the Vectron family of locomotives – Siemens new standard design of heavy haul freight locomotive to operate on European railways. Most are electric but a diesel version has also been designed.  To date 359 have been built for 24 different customers.    Eighteen illustrations and three diagrams.

BR Southern Region electric multiple units, Modern Locomotives Illustrated No 220, August – September 2016 (entire issue).
This issue describes thirty two classes of emu in a modest amount of text, in extensive tables that detail measurements etc, and in numerous illustrations accompanied by extended captions.

Let’s go Glasgow Electric Part 1, Back Track, October 2016, page 580.
Detailed description of the background to the various electrifications that now cover most of the complex suburban network.   The three Reports that all stressed the need for electrification – The Bruce Proposal of 1945, the Fitzpayne Report of 1948, and the Inglis Report of 1951 – updated in 1974 – are all examined and it is interesting to see how most of the recommendations have been acted upon with only a few sections (notably the Kilmacolm line) that did not get wired but instead were closed.   

London Underground  Special, Thirty two page appendix to Rail, 12 October 2016.
Topics include “Under Pressure” a look at some of the solutions to problems facing the deep tube lines; a look at how some overseas systems succeed; the success of the new Overnight services; the new technologies being used to upgrade the tube lines; a look at the history of how today’s complex network came about; finally how the network is meeting the needs of a rapidly growing population.

Still  Going  Round  in  Circles, Narrow Gauge World, November/December 2016, page 36.
Part one of a detailed history of the Glasgow Subway.     Six illustrations.

East  Coast Main Line Signalling, Rail, 9 November 2016, page 72
Part one of a three-part series describing signalling developments along the route south of York. Seven illustrations and one map.   Remarkable survivors from a Victorian age soon to be upgraded include Woodcroft level crossing north of Peterborough – the only manually operated gates across six tracks on Network Rail!

Auf Wiedersehen CityNightLine, Today’s Railways Europe, December 2016, page 32.
A farewell feature about DB’s overnight network that will mostly cease to operate from 11 December 2016.    Four illustrations.

Rail Centre:  Wiener Neustadt, Today’s Railways Europe, December 2016, page 34.
Description of the passenger traffic pouring through this major junction 50km south of Vienna.  Freight is also handled on these lines but the station acts as a major passenger hub.    Map and seven illustrations.

Fourth Rail to Rickmansworth, Railway Bylines, December 2016, page 32
Article about the ex-LNWR line to Rickmansworth and the effect of the Metropolitan Railway’s line on the branch. There are three b/w photos. Immediately after the article there are three photos of a 1954 “Steam World” special at the Met. station in Rickmansworth. The train is hauled by LT steam loco L48.

Amtrak chooses Alstom’s Avelia Liberty trains, Passenger Train Journal, Dec 2016, page 10.
Description of planned new trains to replace the Acela Express sets on the North East Corridor. Five illustrations.

GWML electrification in chaos as NAO issues damning report, Today’s Railways UK,  January 2017,  page 8.
Fairly detailed summary of how much money has already been spent and on which parts of the project, leading to a major shortfall in funds for the actual electrification work parts of which are now having to be postponed for several years.   Four illustrations.

Eastleigh Examined, Today’s Railways UK,  January 2017,  page 38.
History of the lines passing through this important busy junction and the adjacent Eastleigh Works. Although principally a busy hub for passenger services, the article includes a table detailing the twenty freight services passing through the station area during a ten hour period on 6 October 2016.    Thirteen illustrations plus one tiny track diagram that fails to indicate the destinations of the various routes shown.

Mail Rail trains start running through the tunnels, Rail, 4 January 2017, page 22.
Small article recording the progress with the development of a Postal Museum at the old Mount Pleasant Depot.   Two passenger carrying trains have been delivered to the site, lowered 70 feet to the Mail Rail station and have commenced staff training. Five illustrations.

Vivarail’s dream is close to reality, Rail, 4 January 2017, page 32.
Short feature describing how a London Underground D78 train has been virtually totally rebuilt to become a three car diesel powered unit that was to be introduced on the Coventry – Nuneaton line in the near future.    Eight illustrations.    The article was published at virtually the same time as fire damaged the unit as it passed through Kenilworth on 30 December 2016 causing a halt to further testing until the circumstances of the fire are explored.  The plans for the unit’s use on the Coventry – Nuneaton line have been abandoned for the time being.

London’s railways – a bird’s-eye view, Rail, 4 January 2017, page 40.
Seven large illustrations of railways in Central London including excellent shots of St Pancras, Kings Cross and London Bridge with the Shard prominent in several of the views.

Manchester’s major attraction, Rail, 4 January 2017, page 52.
Feature about Manchester Piccadilly station – the first of three features about Manchester’s railways that will appear in forthcoming issues. Seven illustrations.

First UK IEP rolled out, Today’s Railways UK, February 2017, page 28.
Feature about the assembly of IEP trains at the Hitachi Works in Newton Aycliffe.   Description of the first train including the internal fittings. Eleven illustrations.

458/5s finally come good as Wimbledon prepares for new trains, Today’s Railways UK, February 2017, page 56.
The rebuilding programme for the class 458 emus is described. The upgraded trains are now settling down into satisfactory operating mode following resolution of difficulties with the doors.   Wimbledon Depot is being reorganised to handle this fleet as more units arrive to enter service. Seven illustrations.

GA and Eversholt launch “Renatus” 321, Today’s Railways UK, February 2016, page 66.
The Greater Anglia TOC with Eversholt have launched into service the first refurbished Class 321 emu – renamed a “Renatus” unit. In all 30 such units will be created through a complete refurbishment programme which is described in this relatively short article. Five illustrations.

København:  20 Years  of  Change, Today’s Railways Europe, February 2017, page 22.
Long detailed presentation of changes to railway and S-Tog services around the Danish capital during the past two decades.   Two detailed maps,   Thirteen illustrations.

Cross-City S-Bahn Plan for Basel, Today’s Railways Europe,  February 2017, page 36.
Travel by train around the Swiss city of Basel has always been hindered by the need to change trains at Basel Bad station if the ultimate destination was Basel SBB.    Now the Basel Stadt Government has allocated finance to help the planning and eventual building of a new underground link between the two major stations.   One map and five illustrations.

Refurbished “321” Renatus Launched, Modern Railways, February 2017, page 10.
Eversholt and the Greater Anglia TOC launched the first upgraded class 321 emu on 16 December 2016.    Six illustrations show how the train now looks.

A Seat for Everyone, Modern Railways, February 2017, page 57.
Interesting exploration of double deck trains as a possible way to solve London’s growing capacity problem.   Three illustrations of possible designs, several diagrams and tables comparing different types of design.

Piccadilly 175, Modern Railways, February 2017, page 42.
Starting as Stone Street station in 1842, renamed London Road in 1842, and renamed again Piccadilly on 12 September 1960, Manchester’s most important station at present has 12 terminal platforms plus two through platforms.   It was assisted by the adjacent 4-platform Mayfield station from 1910 until 1960 in order to cope with growing suburban traffic.   Interesting description of the history and daily work of the station.   Nine illustrations.

Londoners Turn to Public Transport, Modern Railways, February 2017, page 68.
As road congestion reaches strangulation point, private car use in London has been overtaken by public transport.   A table shows the steady increase in the numbers using the suburban train, Overground trains, Docklands, and Underground trains since 1995.    Bus usage has risen even more steeply than that for all forms of rail use but has shown a drop for the first time in 2015.   Another table shows a breakdown of transport mode at present used and as predicted for 2041  One illustration of a very crowded platform at Liverpool Street Underground station.

The Jubilee Line Extension, Modern Railways, February 2016,  page 70.
A look back at the 1995 extension of the Jubilee Line to Stratford asking the question – Did we get it right?   Various situations faced during the work are re-examined.   At Westminster the extension station was under the existing one which had to be rebuilt.   There were problems concerning an entry in Parliament Square and a complex situation involving several Government Departments had to be resolved before the design was approved.   Other stations that were rebuilt when the Jubilee Line station was added included London Bridge.  Architectural gems used included vast cathedral-like spaces – Canary Wharf station is a magnificent example.   A safety feature is the provision of platform screens at all extension stations.     Six illustrations.
Real-time traffic management on Bern’s metre gauge, Railway Gazette International, February 2017, page 34.
A new traffic management system is now being tested.   This is a measure being taken to handle a boom in passenger numbers on the four-route S-Bahn, which is electrified at 1250v DC, and carried 18.6m passengers in 2016.   A 30% increase is anticipated by 2030.

Israel Railways presses ahead with network expansion, Railway Gazette International,  February 2017, page 38.
A remarkable expansion of new routes, double tracking of several routes, and electrification of all busier lines.    An extremely busy section between Tel Aviv Savidor Central and Shefayim (part on the south – north coastal main line) is being quadrupled.   Four illustrations and an extremely helpful map.

Lanarkshire – neglected market for WCML travel, Today’s Railways UK, March 2017, page 48.
The case is made either for additional main line calls at Motherwell serving a population of 650,000  (more than the 649,045 living in Glasgow) or for a new Parkway station at Newton. Nine illustrations, two tables, one map.

Fenchurch Street – Shoeburyness route explored, Today’s Railways UK,  March 2017, page 54.
Quite detailed description of the route through Basildon to Southend Central and Shoeburyness.   Eighteen illustrations, one table, and one map.

A fleet to meet Merseyside’s specific needs,  Rail, 15 February 2017, page 60.
Fairly long article identifying the rolling stock needs for suburban services around Liverpool using the “Loop” under the city centre for Wirral routes, and the “straight through” routes through Liverpool Central LL.    Six illustrations and one map.

Networker, Juniper and Javelin emu families,  Modern Locomotives  Illustrated,  February/March 2017 (full issue)
All aspects of the design, construction, and operation of these three families of emus – including the Postal Emus – with substantial number of illustrations.

Island  Line at the crossroads, Modern Railways, March 2017, page 18.
Examination of the prospects for the Ryde – Shanklin line on the Isle of Wight where ex-London Underground stock has been in use for fifty years and a new franchise for the South West Trains TOC is imminent.    Can this little railway survive now that holiday makers become fewer in number and arrive increasingly with their cars.   One idea is to convert the line into a tramway.  Four illustrations.

HS2 train procurement – manufacturers stake their claims, Modern Railways, March 2017, page 28.
One of a series of articles about HS2, the possible future operators, and the building of a new fleet of very high-speed trains.   Four illustrations.

ECML electrification – Managing for the long term, Modern Railways, March 2017, page 32.
This article focuses on the upgrading of the overhead line equipment which has had the reputation of failing whenever there was a strong wind.   Five illustrations.

Jurassic Park, Modern Railways, March 2017, page 38.
The rolling stock used on the lines of the Anglia TOC described detailing both good and bad points. The class 321 emus are described as the units that turned the Clacton route from inter-city to commuter.   The significance of this study is that all the trains at present used could be replaced by newer stock when the franchise is awarded to a new TOC.    The present stock could therefore end up on the virtual scrap heap.

New railway under the Alps – Gotthard Base Tunnel open, Modern Railways, March 2017, page 70.
Part one of a two part feature describing the planning and construction of the world’s longest (57km) and deepest (2.3km) tunnel.    This part includes information about the access tracks built so that materials could be brought in and out by rail; the ventilation system which includes the use of the access shafts at Sedrun and Faido;  the emergency stations at Sedrun and Porta Alpina at which passengers can be alighted safely in the event of an emergency;  and the tunnel rescue fire trains.  Seven illustrations, two tables, gradient profile, map, and one diagrammatic representation of the tunnels with the passages between the two running tunnels.

The Railways of Georgia, Today’s Railways Europe, March 2017, page 34.
A useful guide of the railway network spanning a country that few from Western Europe visit.  A main route links the capital Tbilisi with the Black Sea port of Batumi but this important line has just two passenger expresses between these cities each day.   There are several local trains on this line and numerous branch lines but nowhere is there an truly frequent passenger service.   Heavy freight trains are the life-blood of the system.   Nine illustrations and one useful map.

Transforming the Long Island RR,  Passenger Rail Journal, No 1 of 2017, page 16.
The population of Nassau and Suffolk Counties on Long Island is soaring to 3 million and the LIRR must upgrade its infrastructure to accommodate the growing commuter traffic to Manhattan.  The main developments are a new 8 track terminal under Grand Central Station, major expansion of Penn Station by moving the concourse etc to the adjacent Farley Building, the addition of a third track between Floral Park and Hicksville, and double tracking between Farmingdale and Ronkonkoma.  Travel time for many commuters will be cut by 40 minutes.

Rail transit returning to Kitchener-Waterloo, Passenger Rail Journal  No 1 of 2017, page 24.
Canada: Construction of a new 19km long light rail line nearing completion with opening expected in 2018.  Four illustrations.

Barking to Pitsea via Tilbury and Upminster via Ockenden to Grays, Today’s Railways UK, April 2017, page 58.
Part two of an article describing the L.T.&S lines (Part one was in the March 2017 issue) describing the route through Tilbury and the freight and passenger traffic handled.  Fifteen illustrations, one map and five tables.

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